Letting Down

I can remember little conversations I had with myself at full draw, conversations that were more like arguments: one part of me wanted to let down the shot, another wanted me to “finish the job.”

The let down has a long and varied history. For most of my archery life it has been a critical part of an archer’s process. It is so critical that I created a principle based upon it, which I called the Rule of Discipline.” This “rule” says: “If anything, anything at all—mental or physical—intrudes from a prior step or from the environment, you must let down and start over. I learned this the hard way, as I learned so much about archery. I saw professional archers doing this over and over but I still had debates in my mind at full draw as to whether it is desirable. If you, too, have such debates, I suggest that if the topic of a let down comes up in you mind, the only thing to do is to let down because you are no longer thinking in the “now,” that is thinking about what you are doing in the present moment. You are thinking about what you might do in the future.

This role that a let down plays is not new, it has been around for a very long time.

I have heard that when one thinks he has gone too far, he will not have erred.
This sort of rule should not be forgotten.

Yamamoto Tsunetomo, Hagakure

To break my debate habit, I decided that if the idea of a let down occurred to me I would let down 100% of the time. (I like making rules.) Of course, I violated that rule in my first practice session post adopting it. So, I did a drill that I later used to treat a case of target panic I had, I went around a 14-target field course, and from each shooting position, I executed my entire shooting sequence up to aiming, and then I let down and returned the arrow to my quiver. So, I drew my bow 56 times and let down 56 times. It was the only way I thought I could establish in my minds (conscious and subconscious) that a let down was a normal thing, an acceptable thing.

Later as a spectator at a Pacific Coast Championships tournament, I marveled at Rick McKinney and a couple of other archers who let down after their clickers clicked. So, the let down became an interest of mine.

The whole purpose of letting down a drawn bow is that the odds of a good outcome when a shot has “gone astray” are very low. We teach archers to “never shot a shot you know is bad.” Why would you do such a thing? Not only is the score of that arrow likely to be low, archery is a repetition sport and repeating an action you have just done is easier than doing it from scratch. So, you just shot a poor shot and, even if you got lucky and it scored well, it is easier to do that bad shot over than to do “your shot” next. (This is why we incorporate a visualization of a perfect shot into our shot sequences, so we have something to follow.) So, archers are trained to let down, to break off any shot that seems to be heading in the wrong direction (sorry, bad pun).

There are modern trends away from this signpost of a well-trained shot, though. The decision to cut the time for each shot in the head-to-head competitions under World Archery (in the Olympics, World Championships, etc.) has had consequences. The head-to-head format was adopted to make our sport more telegenic and therefore audience attracting and the amount of time given to shoot each arrow has been cut from 40 seconds, to 30 seconds, and most recently to 20 seconds for the same reason. But there is an inherent conflict in this rule change. One of the reasons to call of a shot is timing. If a shot is taking too long, it is conceivable that it could take up more than half of the time given to complete the shot. This does not leave enough time to execute the let down and shot the shot in good order. So, we saw archers in the 2012 Olympics (London) shoot a 10 followed by a 6. A replay of the video showed that the archer was taking too long on the second shot and muscled their way to finish the shot. After a bad score is better than no score.

I don’t know if this is good for archery. I suspect not as archery is a precision and repetition sport. Time constraints, especially unreasonable ones, affect both of those.

So, do we teach letting down or do we try to learn some new way to fight through an ill-timed shot?

What do you think?

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7 Comments

Filed under For All Coaches

7 responses to “Letting Down

  1. George Zimmerman

    Hello: The greatest number of archers are recreation archers which means this activity is suppose to be relaxing. I feel that teaching the let down early in the archers learning curve allows for a more relaxed shooting experience. Bad shots builds up an emotional storm that takes the relaxing aspect of the activity and sours it. I am beginning to let down more often and I feel that the enjoyment level of the activity increasing.

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    • Good point. I know of one famous coach who teaches a let down as the first thing, as a safety precaution, in case something goes wrong, they have a bail out procedure, which is your point.

      Thanks!

      On Sat, Jul 2, 2016 at 8:15 PM, A Blog for Archery Coaches wrote:

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  2. David Beeton

    Totally agree with George. I try to get my students into the frame of mind that letting down is a position of strength and not weakness. I must say that I would be concerned if the time allowance for shooting is reduced so far that there is limited, or even no, possibility for allowing a let down and restart.

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    • So, be concerned as it is already happening. Watch the Olympic coverage and you will see some very bad shots for time reasons (during alternate shot format). I have suggested that instead of 20 sec per shot, they use a Chess Clock approach, so that one let down in every three arrows would be possible.

      On Sun, Jul 3, 2016 at 12:08 PM, A Blog for Archery Coaches wrote:

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  3. Tony Allegretti

    …How about…if you draw down, the clock stops ???

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  4. Tony Allegretti

    …That is clock stops on LET DOWN…

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    • It is an option … and a nest of snakes with complaints about clock operators. With a chess clock system, the archers themselves would “hit the button” not some official. But, it would be better than nothing.

      On Mon, Jul 4, 2016 at 7:49 AM, A Blog for Archery Coaches wrote:

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