Five Reasons Archers Fail to Improve

Once again I am inspired by a blog post of a golf coach. In this case it was 5 Reasons Why Golfer’s Don’t Improve by Adam Young. I find there is a correspondence between these two individual sports that is very much worth paying attention to.

Here is how I translated the five reasons golfers don’t improve into five reasons archers don’t improve.

  1. Flawed Thinking
    This is generally passed from one generation of archers to another in the form of helpful advice. As an example, it is not uncommon for an archer to grab his/her bow at the loosing of the string so as to not drop it. Of course, you know that “shoot, grab; shoot, grab” occasionally become “grab, shoot” and off an arrow goes into the woods. But often archers are told to “not grab the bow like that” but are not coached as to how to shoot with a relaxed bow hand. This is why we see so many compound archers shooting with outstretched fingers, which is another, different flaw that should be avoided. Often the people given the “don’t grab the bow advice” are shooting with outstretched fingers and are providing an example of what not to do in the form of advice of “what to do.” They will even praise a newbie for doing it as they do it.

This is not so much flawed thinking but a lack of thinking. It is applying correctives without understanding what they do in the belief that the people giving advice know what they are doing.

  1. Practicing Faults
    Beginning archers are often obsessed with “doing it right.” Where they get their information about the “right way to do things” is often flawed and they then end up practicing diligently doing it wrong, thinking they are doing it right.

A better way to approach this is acknowledging that is no one way to shoot a bow and everyone has to work out what works for them. (This will be opposed by people selling the “right way to shoot,” of course.) There are some basic constraints on building an archery shot, of course. Standing with your feet on the wrong side of the shooting line makes shooting way more difficult, for example. But within the basic constraints most people shoot slightly differently from their peers. Each archer has to build and refine their own shot, then they need to progress to what is better, not just what they think is “right.”

  1. Thinking You Are Not Capable of Doing It “That Way”
    The famous quote of Henry Ford is that “If you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” When you accept that you are incapable of doing something, you essentially stop any positive learning. If you think you can’t learn something, then your learning process is fouled up. (I keep beating this dead horse, but it won’t get up and run!) It is one thing to not want to put out the effort necessary to learn something, but another to think you “can’t.” This is not a growth mindset, it is a static mindset, and if you want to be an accomplished archer, you need to accept that you can learn to do anything you set your mind to learn.
  2. You Can’t Bring Your Practice Game to Competitions
    If there is a big gap between your practice performances and your competition performances, you are practicing wrong. The whole purpose of shooting practice rounds is to test your current state of skill at scoring. If the conditions that exist in the two arenas are vastly different, you aren’t measuring what you think. Would you expect to do well outdoors in a long distance competition only practicing indoors at short distances? Do you expect to shoot well in the wind when your practice facility is deal calm most of the time? Do you expect to be able to learn how to shoot uphill or downhill shots on a flat range?

As archers become more proficient, they also become more consistent. Their practice scores are more consistent. Their competition scores become more consistent and their practice scores and competition scores get closer together. This is deliberate to some extent because they work at including competition factors into their practice sessions.

  1. What You Are Doing Won’t Make You Any Better
    The common Internet meme called the “definition of insanity” being “doing something over and over and expecting different results” comes to mind. To the contrary, if you want to get better, you must do activities designed to make one thing better, specifically, at a time. This is why drills are effective. You can home in on something and practice it to make it better. This is partially why we have shot sequences, so we can look at the various stages of our shot making and evaluate them and find ways to make the weaker parts stronger.

Contrast this with what commonly passes for archery practice. (I know; I practiced this way for years!) We go to the range and shoot arrows on the practice butts for a time. Or we sit on the range and shoot practice rounds. If this worked, driving to work every day would make you a better driver (it actually makes you worse!). If this worked, students trying to learn algebra would just take tests over and over until they learned how to pass one. We do not do this because it does not work. Instead we read texts, we work though practice problems that have been demonstrated and then try our hand at solving practice questions that have answers we can check. Before we take the algebra test, we might take a “practice test” (the equivalent of an archer’s practice round) but we wouldn’t take practice test after practice test as a study method because it is too danged inefficient. We all know this. This is why teachers teach the way they do: break it down, learn the parts, put it back together, practice, practice, practice.

Archers need help figuring out what to do to improve. This is why Mike Gerard and I are writing The Archery Drill Book which we hope will be out in late summer or the fall. Drills in the book are accompanied by descriptions of what they were designed to accomplish and how you can tell you’ve accomplished that. We hope this will help. (We know this will help!)

5 Comments

Filed under For All Coaches

5 responses to “Five Reasons Archers Fail to Improve

  1. I’m looking forward to the new book!

    Like

  2. George Zimmerman

    Hello Steve. Are taking pre-orders for your book? I dimly remember you mentioning another such book in another article. Do you recall the title of it? I think that the pair would be a good fit for the Hamilton Archery Center.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The book with be published under the title of “The Archery Drill Book” by Human Kinetics Publishing. We will not be selling the book directly. I will announce the book when it becomes available and how you can get a copy. Thanks for the interest!

      On Tue, May 7, 2019 at 8:29 AM A Blog for Archery Coaches wrote:

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