External v. Internal Cuing

A reader of this blog and Archery Focus sent me the following link (https://coachingyoungathletes.com/how-to-use-coaching-cues-most-effectively) regarding using two varieties of coaching cues: called internal and external cues. I recommend the article to you as being well worth reading, but I was asked for comment and examples of coaching cues of these types from the sport of archery. So, here goes!

The word “cues” in this context are things we say to characterize an action we wish an archery student to take. A classic one we have used forever, it seems, with beginners is to “stand up tall,” advice given to archers who are slouching. I have written about this bad advice before, so I won’t belabor the point again.

Here’s another scenario. Students who have struggled with being a bit overbowed can end up with a collapsing bow arm. At full draw their bow arm bends at the elbow more and more the longer they hold. Here are two instructions to help these students overcome this form flaw:
A—At full draw think of your draw elbow as being dead straight, not locked but dead straight, as if there were a rod in it.
B—At full draw reach gently with your bow arm toward the target. Don’t lean, just reach.

Which of these is an internal cue and which an external cue? I imagine you all got this one right: A is internal, B is external. The key distinction is that studies show that athletes respond much better to external cues than internal ones. I think there are not only good reasons for this there is quite good evidence backing it up.

Oh, the line between internal and external is “to the body of the archer.” The cue either references something inside or out of the archer’s body.

Cues? Cues? I don’ gotta show you no stinkin’ cues!

The primary difference, I think, is an external cue gives you something to do, while an internal cue gives you something to think about. This is why I avoid asking archer’s to visualize anything during a shot. Visualizing a perfect shot just before raising the bow, thus beginning to shoot, is a mechanism to provide your subconscious mind with a plan to execute (aka marching orders, instructions, etc.) Additional visualizations (think of your bow arm as if there is a rod in it, or think of your draw arm as a rope with a hook on the end, or . . .) are counterproductive because they confuse the instruction set just sent to the Subconscious Plan Receiving Room and they give you something to think about, not something to do.

So, as coaches we best serve our students by giving them external cues to guide their actions rather than cues that are internal to their bodies.

Postscript I have mentioned before the viewpoints of coach and archer are diametrically opposed. The archer’s viewpoint is from the inside out, while the coach’s is from the outside in. What athlete and coach need to know are thus quite opposite from one another. Coaches benefit, for example, from knowing the muscles involved in making shots, but the athlete does not. This is why there are some books I do not recommend to archers, Kisik Lee’s books being foremost. Archers think they will learn Coach Lee’s “secrets” but instead they find out that his books were written primarily to influence coaches and so only serve to confuse archers. (If I have to read another archer discussion on the importance of LAN2, I will scream.) If you coach recurve archers, you need to read Coach Lee’s books. If you are an archer, not so much.

Oh, and this is why serious competing archers should not be doing serious coaching at the same time. The tradition of archers coaching after they “retire” from serious competition is based upon a good idea. Mixing the two viewpoints only serves to confuse both minds.

 

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Filed under For All Coaches, Q & A

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