Rather Fight than Switch?

QandA logoHi,
I was reading your blog site and wanted to ask a question. Like many people I’m naturally right-handed but from an early age I taught myself have a level of skill with my left hand. Though not completely ambidextrous I can write, shave, saw, etc. with either hand.

Recently I’ve been coaching a number of left-handed students so I taught myself to shoot left-handed. I wonder has anyone else done this? Don’t think I’ll win any medals but it has helped with coaching and course laying. I found it a very educational process as you reapply learnt and known skills but reversed or, rather, flipped.

It also means the students don’t have to try to learn from you whilst trying to flip round everything in their heads. So I was wondering, have you or your readers done this?
Thanks for all the articles and posts.
Rob
http://offthearrowshelf.wordpress.com/

***

Rob, I will get around to answering your question (I promise!), but first a couple of comments (I am, if nothing ellse, long-winded).

I am strongly in favor of coaches trying everything, especially if you want to coach it. Much of archery applies across the board, but if you haven’t experienced it yourself, you can make some really bad mistakes (I can attest to this). In my “career” as a coach I have learned Barebow Compound, Barebow Recurve, and Olympic Recurve, and Longbow, first hand because (a) I was curious, and (b) I wanted to coach these.

Since I took these up rather late in life, I am not very good at any of them. In fact, I don’t think you have to be particularly good at all of the “styles” you attempt, but you do need to be good at one of them (my primary style when I was younger was Compound Unlimited, now it is Compound Barebow). If you never achieve expert status in any style, it will be hard to work with advanced or elite athletes, not just because you will have no “standing” as someone who never achieved in that style, but because you will lack understanding of the nuances and commitments involved.

My favorite story about deciding to “stand on the other side of the bow” was from George Chapman, a champion archer and champion coach (associated with PSE because he was there at their beginning). He won the Indiana State Championship shooting right-handed and then because of some reason (injury, target panic, ?) he switched to shooting left-handed and won the same title the very next year! For people considering the “right-left” change, please be aware that “results may vary!”

Now, to answer your question, I have tried several times to shoot left-handed (from my “normal” right-handed shooting) but never to the point of any proficiency. Now, I think I am too old and clumsy to pull it off.

But … (you knew that was coming, no?) it is a good idea to at least try it. One of the better tools in a coach’s tool box is “mirroring,” which is standing face-to-face with your archer on the shooting line and demonstrating (mimetically) what you want them to do as they shoot. This has to be opposite-handed to what they shoot so that you look like a mirror image of what they are to do. If you have not actually shot that way, your body positions when “mirroring” may be faulty, so at least some practice that way is wise.

Check out Rob’s blog where he will repost this article and answer the question for him!

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2 Comments

Filed under For All Coaches, Q & A

2 responses to “Rather Fight than Switch?

  1. Reblogged this on My Archery Experiences and commented:
    Thanks for posting my question and I’ll be interested in seeing what feedback we get. I think my slight advantage is having a level or skill with my left made it easier to pick up and at least get a reasonable grouping.
    Thanks again

  2. I always shot right handed although I’m a lefty. Why? My father wouldn’t buy me a bow and make my two brothers (we are right handed) share one. In the past year I started shooting left handed due to an injury on my right hand. What I found is that shooting with my left improved my right! I have a better sense of feel with my left. As for teaching, righties have a harder time connecting with lefties, I’m also able to show them from the same side and most people learn by seeing. What frustrates people is that it is not as simple as just picking it up and shooting. When you switch sides, you have to start all over.

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